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Fun Facts about Gear!

Home Operation Snowflake
TGCSG West Point Oregon Trek
Ok so now that you are a part of the Outdoor Group you know that we spend time outside all year long! So what does that mean for you? You could decide that you only want to participate during certain times of the year, and no we won't tease you too badly for that, or you could participate all year with us. This means that you may need to acquire a few pieces of gear that you wouldn't normally have!

First things first! DON'T BUY ANYTHING until you know for sure you will like the activity you are trying!!! This is really important!!! The Outdoor group does many things that you may or may not like as you try them you will figure out what you like and what you don't. If you spend lots of money on gear for an activity that you think you'll like and end up hating then you are out of a lot of money! SO BORROW FIRST! Your best bet is to ask family members, especially ones who ski, fish, hunt, or camp!
Specific gear Lists and Guides: Winter Gear List
Three Season Gear List
Sleeping Bag Check List
Boot Check List
Tent Check List
Things COG Has:
* Tents!!! we have both 4 and 3 season, backpacking light tents and heavy duty winter expedition tents so don't worry about tents!
*Dining flies and tarps. We have lots of tarps and dining flies that you will get to learn how to best set up depending on the trip
*Stoves!! Not only do we have propane family camping stoves but me have a myriad (vocab word look it up) of backpacking stoves. All of which you will learn to use!
*Cooking gear. We've got pots, pans, plates, bowls, cups, utensils you name it!
Things you will need:
***Framed Backpack. Could be both an internal or an external
***Sleeping bag rated to AT LEAST 30°F or better yet a 0°F rated bag!
***Synthetic long underwear. Yep you heard me NON COTTON! try Poly-pro which can be found at any ski/camping shop or dept.
******RAIN GEAR! This one is really important! No matter what we are doing at what time of year it is important that you have serious rain gear! This means NO flimsy ponchos from Disney world!
Your best bet is to find a decent priced rain suit or backpacking poncho. Try Outdoor World in Southington. They have good prices and carry what you need not all the expensive mountaineering suits!
A Little Lecture On Rain Gear!
This is one of the most important pieces of gear you either borrow or buy! Yes Breathability is BEST but NOT ALWAYS NECESSARY! What is necessary is that you stay dry during our trips. One of the cheapest workable options is a Backpackers Poncho.

What's different about a Backpacking poncho is the length and the ability to snap together the poncho around your arms in different spots depending on whether or not you are carrying a pack. These ponchos are longer in back than they are in front to cover a pack. They also snap up to be shorter in back if you are not carrying a pack. Look for one that has grommets as well. These can be used as a tarp for a backcountry shelter, tied to gear to cover...and just about anything else you can think of. Usually these ponchos are a little more expensive than a regular poncho but well worth it!
Breathable Waterproof material is the best for rain gear. The reason for this is if you sweat the material lets it out by "breathing". This means you don't end up wet from sweat! The most recognizable material is Gor-Tex© however many companies are coming out with Breathable Laminates daily. Some are good some aren't DO YOUR RESEARCH! Gor-Tex© is expensive! and we don't expect you to have it! If you really want breathable water proof material something you might want to look at is Frogg Toggs
Froggtoggs are a new breathable fabric rain suit that is affordable! You could buy a normally priced plastic suit for the same price. These suits can be found for about 55$. They are not terribly rugged so you will have to be careful not to rip them if you are out running about in the woods but they are really waterproof AND are very light! which is great for backpacking. They are reported to be more breathable than Gor-Tex© however they are NO WHERE NEAR as durable.
Winter Gear List! Back
Outerwear
waterproof/ preferably breathable jacket
waterproof/ preferably breathable pants
insulated parka
fleece jacket or wool sweater
corduroy, fleece or wool pants
synthetic pants
Base Layer
expedition-weight long john top
expedition-weight long john bottoms
midweight long john top
midweight long john bottoms
long sleeve T-shirt
synthetic briefs
synthetic sports bra



Accessories
wool or fleece hat
balaclava
midweight wool or fleece gloves
heavyweight wool or fleece mittens
synthetic liner gloves
waterproof overmitts



Footwear
waterproof hiking boots
wool or synthetic socks
liner socks
insulated camp booties
"duck" boots for snowflake










Extras
sun hat
bandanna
waterproof gaiters
32 oz. water bottles (2)
water bottle parkas (2)
sunglasses
chemical heat packs








Personal Gear
Internal or external frame backpack
convertible or four-season tent
sleeping bag (30° to 0°F or below)
inflatable sleeping pad
closed-cell foam sleeping pad
lighter and waterproof matches
eating utensils, bowl, and insulated mug
headlamp w/extra batteries and bulb
pocket knife or multitool
compass
first-aid kit with personal medications
stuff sacks
assorted zipper-lock bags
sunscreen (SPF 15+)
lip balm (SPF 15+)
Three Season Gear List Back
Outerwear
waterproof/breathable jacket
waterproof/breathable pants
fleece jacket or wool sweater
waterproof gaiters
synthetic hiking pants
synthetic shorts
Base Layer
midweight long john top
midweight long john bottoms
long sleeve T-shirt
synthetic briefs
synthetic sports bra
synthetic T-shirt
Accessories
wool or fleece hat
midweight wool or fleece gloves



Footwear
waterproof hiking boots
camp footwear
wool or synthetic socks (3)
liner socks (2)












Extras
sun hat
bandanna
compass
sunglasses
insect repellent
mesh head net or suit










Gear
Internal or external frame backpack
sleeping bag (15° to 30°F)
inflatable sleeping pad
lighter and waterproof matches
eating utensils, bowl, and insulated mug
headlamp w/extra batteries and bulb
32 oz. water bottles (2)
water treatment (filter, tablets, or drops)
pocket knife or multitool
first-aid kit with personal medications
stuff sacks
assorted zipper-lock bags
bear-bagging rope (or canister)
sunscreen (SPF 15+)
lip balm (SPF 15+)
toilet paper and trowel
Sleeping Bag Check List! Back
For This
Condition Choose This
Temp. Rating Look For
These Features
Summer/ desert
40°F
Brushed or fleece lining for no-stick comfort, minimal features (hood and draft collar optional), wraparound zipper to open for blanket use
Rainforest
-
Synthetic fill, water-resistant shell
Winter
0°F
Adjustable draft collar, contoured hood, 6" of extra length for storing water bottles, clothes, and cold-sensitive gear
High mountain/ arctic
20°F or lower
Down fill for compressibility, extra length for water-bottle storage, extra girth (optional) for layering
Snow cave/ tentless - Water-resistant/windproof shell or bivy sack
For This Sleep Style Look For
These Features
Thrasher Elastic seams (for stretch), semirectangular shape or big-guy girth (for more space), or expansion panels (for adjustable space)
Snuggler Mating zippers on same-length bags so you can cozy up with a significant other
Perspirer Brushed or fleece lining (or bag liner), synthetic fill, breathable shell (no laminates or special coatings), two-way zipper
Boots Back
For This
Temperature
Look For
These Features
Hot Fabric/leather upper, mesh panels
Cold All-leather upper with fleece or Thinsulate insulation
Extreme cold Plastic double boots or felt-lined pac boots
For This Moisture Look For
These Features
Wet Waterproof/breathable liner, leather upper with few seams, ankle-high or above-ankle cut
Dry Non waterproof fabric/leather upper, mesh panels, low cut
For This Pack Weight Look For
These Features
50+ pounds Stiff midsole and upper, ankle-high or above-ankle cut
25 pounds or less Below-ankle or ankle-high cut, flexible forefoot, grippy tread
For This Terrain Look For
These Features
Rugged, rocky off trail Above-ankle cut, stiff shank and midsole, rockered (or curved) sole for long treks
Steep, icy Very stiff soles and treads, crampon compatible, high cut with substantial leather or synthetic uppers
Flat and fast Below-ankle or ankle-high cut, moderately stiff sole with good forefoot spring, grippy tread
Snow Insulation, aggressive lug pattern for traction
Slickrock scrambling Sticky rubber tread, high toe rand, flexible forefoot
For These Ankles Look For
These Features
Strong Low cut, flexible fabric or leather upper
Weak High cut, stiff leather upper, moderate to stiff midsole
Tents Back
For This
Weather
Look For
These Features
Hot Plentiful mesh, a rainfly with vents or a venting system, light colors to reflect solar heat
Wet Mesh walls, a large vestibule, a light-colored rainfly to brighten the interior, ample ceiling height for all-day card games, simple setup
Cold No mesh (unless windows zip closed), dark floor for sunny-day drying, mitten-friendly setup
High Mountain or Winter Dome or hoop design, three or more poles for stability, numerous or winter guypoints and ski-ready stake loops, large vestibule, dark floor
Windy Dome or hoop, three or more poles, numerous guypoints, an adjustable rainfly (cinch tight to reduce flapping)
All Conditions Sealable mesh windows, pole and/or rainfly options for three-season or winter use
For This Terrain Look For
These Features
Sand Freestanding dome or A-frame to handle poor staking conditions, ultrafine mesh to keep out blowing sand
Snow Freestanding design preferable, floor should be seamless or factory taped
For This Comfort Look For
These Features
Less pack weight Hoop design or tarp, lots of mesh, minimal vestibule and pole structure, tapered floor plan
Fast pitch One-way pole sleeves, quick-clip buckles at corners of rainfly, freestanding design (requires fewer stakes), no separate setup for vestibule
Quick escapes

Double doors, hip-high vestibule or entryway, easy-to-reach zipper pulls
Easy living Steep side walls, high ceiling, double doors and vestibules, clear plastic windows in rainfly, sealable windows

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